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Is Rainwater Harvesting a Good Investment
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Tale of Two Cities Rainwater Harvesting in Taos
Water - Why Care
Save Energy, Save Water

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Chlorination, Part I
Chlorination, Part II
Importance of pH
Is Rainwater Safe
Potable Rainwater: Filtration and Purification
UV Purification
UV and Carbon Filtration

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First Ever US RWH Study ReleasedNew Price

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A Review of the City of Santa Fe Water Conservation Rebate Program

This first-time ever long-term rebate study analyzes the costs and benefits of water conservation rebates. It finds that water conservation rebates can be cost effective at saving water for utilities and consumers if designed properly. >> more

Greywater Gone Wild

Reusing greywater is a great way to conserve water. It also has some nice advantages —one can accurately predict the quantity a system will produce, plus it is rich in nutrients, which is great for landscaping. As a reminder, greywater is all water leaving the house that is not from the toilets or the kitchen. >> more

Bladders – Another Storage Option

The tank is the most expensive component of a rainwater harvesting system. This is true whether the tank is above ground or below ground. Consequently, many people opt to undersize the tank in order to save money. Fortunately, there are alternatives to solid-walled tanks that can reduce the cost of a system. >> more

The Big Thirst

The Big Thirst - The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water is a good read for those interested in learning more about our global water crisis. It offers stories from around the globe of both water shortages as well as water successes. From Las Vegas to Australia to Spain to Italy to Atlanta; engaging stories on how water is being used and how municipalities are struggling to meet surging water demands. >> more

Space Heating for Free

Most projects I design are fairly standard rainwater or thermal solar systems, but every now and then I get to design one that is far from routine. One such project involved space heating a small master bathroom for a local couple who cares a great deal about living a small energy footprint.A small electric heater would suffice for most folks. But this couple, who get monthly checks from PNM >> more

Active Water Management

There are many ways to save water — conservation, passive rainwater catchment, onsite recycling (i.e., greywater) and active rainwater catchment. All of these methods require that you actively manage your water use, as opposed to just paying your bill each month and not thinking about how much water you use.

Comparing Rainwater Storage Options

Storage tanks, usually the most expensive component of the rainwater harvesting system, come in a wide variety of sizes and types. When deciding on the type of tank to use, the main factors to consider include where you live and your budget. >> more

How Many Rainwater Guides Are Enough?

As a few of you know, one of my pet peeves is the overabundance of largely repetitive rainwater harvesting guidebooks. How many is enough? Do we really need to continue spending hard earned taxpayers monies (or even private monies, for that matter) on doing numerous manuals on rainwater catchment? Do we need one for every city in the US or every major city in the world? Do these really create value? >> more

Rainbarrels - A Great Place to Start

These days rain barrels are very easy to acquire for catching the rain. Most garden and landscape stores stock them in a wide variety of colors, sizes and shapes. Not only can sizes and materials vary but also the design. Gone are the days of plain, brown or green food-grade barrels. >> more

Save Energy, Save Water, and Be Smart About It

Many of us want to live more sustainably and yet feel overwhelmed by the many options and conflicting views that are out there. Should I install a photovoltaic system, a rainwater harvesting system, a geothermal or solar thermal system? All are good options and if done properly will increase your water/energy security, save dollars over the long term, and help reduce your carbon/water footprint. Many of us are not fortunate enough to do them all so we have to prioritize. And to do that, we need information. Water and energy audits are a great way to start. >> more

Residential Gutters

Gutter sizing is an aspect of rainwater collection that has been studied extensively and can be calculated based on published guidelines in the plumbing codes. For example, the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) recommends that a gutter system be able to carry the runoff of the heaviest 60 minute downpour recorded in the last 100 years. >> more

UV and Carbon Filtration - A Common Oversight

Many rainwater harvesting systems used for drinking water rely on a combination of sediment filters, carbon filters and ultraviolet (UV) light to remove all unhealthy impurities and ensure the water is potable. This common water purification system has proven effective for decades; however, it is not equally effective in all systems. >> more

Once is Never Enough, Use it Twice

There are numerous ways to make your water go further these days. One easy but often overlooked method to cut your water bill is to use your water twice. Unlike electricity, water can be reused over and over again. Installing a greywater system is one way to stretch your gallons.>> more

Is Rainwater Harvesting a Good Investment?

Is harvesting rainwater a good investment? We will explore that question in depth in this three-part series, beginning in Part One with a traditional economic payback approach. The short answer is, yes, >> more

Tanks Can Be Beautiful

Culvert PictureThe award-winning home of Frank Herdman and Alice Temple proves that rainwater catchment tanks can add both beauty and functionality to a home’s design. Frank and Alice fell in love years ago with their Casa Solana Santa Fe neighborhood. They bought a fixer-upper Stamm house with poor natural lighting, low ceilings, and a small, broken-up floor plan and turned it into their dream home with natural lighting and a thoroughly contemporary design. >> more

Passive versus Active Rainwater Harvesting

There is wide spread interest in water conservation and specifically in capturing and rainwater harvesting in both residential and commercial buildings to reduce costs, reduce the environmental impact of the building and lessen the load on the municipal sewer and stormwater systems in the arid southwest where droughts are a way of life. Harvesting rainwater from rooftops is one solutions to conserving our precious water, where it can be used instead of municipal drinking water for many non-drinking water (i.e. non-potable) applications (e.g. landscape, toilet flushing) as well as drinking water. There are two general types of rainwater catchment systems - "active" or "passive". >> more

Rainwater Harvesting System Integrated into Home Design

This rainwater harvesting (RWH) system, with an above-ground, 7,500 gallon (usable) poured-concrete cistern, used for both potable and nonpotable purposes, was designed and constructed in 2001 as an integral part of a new single-family home in Key Largo, Florida. Rain is collected from a 1,700 square-foot white Galvalume roof and gathered in six-inch copper gutters with spash shields at roof valleys for occasional heavy downpours. Copper plumbing is used throughout the house as well. >> more

One Way To Conserve on the Ranch and Farm

Agriculture and ranching consume a substantial amount of potable and pumped water around the country, and to some extent in Northern New Mexico. In some areas of the US, farms and livestock consume up to 60% of overall water use. This water is usually either clean, highly processed potable water or well water pumped from precious underground aquifers. >> more

Rainwater Catchment System Pump Sizing

Pumps are an integral part of almost all rainwater catchment systems; however, sizing a pump correctly is not straightforward and installers often fail to make the appropriate calculations. Much has been written on pumps for irrigation systems and for wells, but rainwater harvesting pumps can be markedly different. This series of articles is aimed at shedding light on the differences and assisting in properly sizing rainwater pumps. This first article will explain pumps and general pumping concepts >> more

Potable Rainwater: Filtration and Purification

Rainwater harvesting is viewed by many, including the EPA, as a partial solution to the problems posed by water scarcity: droughts and desertification, erosion from runoff, over-reliance on depleted aquifers, and the costs of new irrigation, diversion, and water treatment facilities. Harvested rainwater in the U.S. is used mostly for irrigation; however, there is a growing interest in using rainwater for drinking and other indoor uses. >> more

Free Rain, Free Watering and Exercise All in One

Pedaling to Pump Water

Always looking to do more with less? Like help the environment and getting exercise at the same time? Well Larry Gilg did, and he found a way: "I hooked a water pump to a bicycle trainer and use it to pump water out of my rainwater system." Watering his yard, totally for FREE and getting exercise at the same time. >> more

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LATEST ARTICLES

WATER NEWS

September 2014

Into The Storm: Forecasting The Future Of Water

Think the Southwest’s Drought Is Bad Now? It Could Last a Generation or More

Water Shortages Strike Another State

Are Fracking Chemicals Getting Too Close To Drinking Water Aquifers?

August 2014

Satellites Show Major Southwest Groundwater Loss

July 2014

Storms Get Headlines, but Drought Is a Sneaky, Devastating Game-Changer

Saving Water in California

Waste Not, Want Not

June 2014

First Ever Long-Term Rebate Study

Arizona Cities Could Face Cutbacks in Water From Colorado River, Officials Say

Home Water Management Using Rain Barrels

May 2014

A Postmodern Water Frontier

April 2014

Five Melbourne companies guzzle water

Drought Defense

Time to finally protect wetlands, streams

Texas Wins Advantage In Groundwater Fight With New Mexico

Texas Water Rules Are A Mess

March 2014

Water crisis in the twilight zone

The Thirsty West: What Happens in Vegas Doesn’t Stay in Vegas

West’s Drought and Growth Intensify Conflict Over Water Rights

New Indirect Potable Reuse Regulations — What To Expect

The Thirsty West: Can Tucson Survive Climate Change?

Conserve and Get a Smiley Face

February 2014

Days of Desiccation

EPA Releases Climate Assessment Update To National Stormwater Calculator

California Seeing Brown Where Green Used to Be

Malta needs 'national watermanagement plan

Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst

Parched, California Cuts Off Tap to Agencies

January 2014

Its Great Lake Shriveled, Iran Confronts Crisis of Water Supply

EPA Announce Science Research Grants

3 Tips For Utilities On Effective Consumer Outreach

EPA Stormwater Ruling: How Will It Impact Utilities?

Spending Bill Includes Over $2 Billion For State Water Funds

California areas brace for water rationing as reservoir levels fall

Chemical levels in West Virginia water drop, but still no end in sight to ban

EPA's Top 10 Technology Needs For Water

Lead In D.C. Water Associated With Miscarriages

Is This the Future of RO

Old Water News >>

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